Newsweek Showcase
 Wednesday, 26 Dec 2007 Home Advertise Contact Us Site Map Testimonials Newsweek.com Disclaimer

Education Administration

<< Back to subjects spotlights

  • Many jobs require a master’s or doctoral degree and experience in a related occupation, such as a teacher or admissions counselor.
  • Strong interpersonal and communication skills are essential because much of an administrator’s job involves working and collaborating with others.
  • Job outlook is expected to be excellent because a large proportion of education administrators are expected to retire over the next 10 years.

Smooth operation of an educational institution requires competent administrators. Education administrators provide instructional leadership as well as manage the day-to-day activities in schools, preschools, daycare centers, and colleges and universities. They also direct the educational programs of businesses, correctional institutions, museums, and job training and community service organizations.

Education administrators set educational standards and goals and establish the policies and procedures to carry them out. They also supervise managers, support staff, teachers, counselors, librarians, coaches, and others. They develop academic programs; monitor students’ educational progress; train and motivate teachers and other staff; manage guidance and other student services; administer recordkeeping; prepare budgets; handle relations with parents, prospective and current students, employers, and the community; and perform many other duties. In an organization such as a small daycare center, one administrator may handle all these functions. In universities or large school systems, responsibilities are divided among many administrators, each with a specific function.

Principal
Those who manage elementary, middle, and secondary schools are called principals. They set the academic tone and hire, evaluate, and help improve the skills of teachers and other staff. Principals confer with staff to advise, explain, or answer procedural questions. They visit classrooms, observe teaching methods, review instructional objectives, and examine learning materials. They actively work with teachers to develop and maintain high curriculum standards, develop mission statements, and set performance goals and objectives. Principals must use clear, objective guidelines for teacher appraisals, because pay often is based on performance ratings.

Principals also meet and interact with other administrators, students, parents, and representatives of community organizations. Decision making authority has increasingly shifted from school district central offices to individual schools. Thus, parents, teachers, and other members of the community play an important role in setting school policies and goals. Principals must pay attention to the concerns of these groups when making administrative decisions.

Principals prepare budgets and reports on various subjects, including finances and attendance, and oversee the requisition and allocation of supplies. As school budgets become tighter, many principals have become more involved in public relations and fundraising to secure financial support for their schools from local businesses and the community.

Principals must take an active role to ensure that students meet national, State, and local academic standards. Many principals develop school/business partnerships and school-to-work transition programs for students. Increasingly, principals must be sensitive to the needs of the rising number of non-English speakig and culturally diverse students. Growing enrollments, which are leading to overcrowding at many existing schools, also are a cause for concern. When addressing problems of inadequate resources, administrators serve as advocates for the building of new schools or the repair of existing ones. During summer months, principals are responsible for planning for the upcoming year, overseeing summer school, participating in workshops for teachers and administrators, supervising building repairs and improvements, and working to be sure the school has adequate staff for the school year.

Schools continue to be involved with students’ emotional welfare as well as their academic achievement. As a result, principals face responsibilities outside the academic realm. For example, in response to the growing numbers of dual-income and single-parent families and teenage parents, schools have established before- and after-school childcare programs or family resource centers, which also may offer parenting classes and social service referrals. With the help of community organizations, some principals have established programs to combat increases in crime, drug and alcohol abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases among students.

Assistant Principal
Assistant principals aid the principal in the overall administration of the school. Some assistant principals hold this position for several years to prepare for advancement to principal jobs; others are career assistant principals. They are primarily responsible for scheduling student classes, ordering textbooks and supplies, and coordinating transportation, custodial, cafeteria, and other support services. They usually handle student discipline and attendance problems, social and recreational programs, and health and safety matters. They also may counsel students on personal, educational, or vocational matters. With the advent of site-based management, assistant principals are playing a greater role in ensuring the academic success of students by helping to develop new curriculums, evaluating teachers, and dealing with school-community relations—responsibilities previously assumed solely by the principal. The number of assistant principals that a school employs may vary, depending on the number of students.

Education Administrator
In preschools and childcare centers, education administrators are the director or supervisor of the school or center. Their job is similar to that of other school administrators in that they oversee daily activities and operation of the schools, hire and develop staff, and make sure that the school meets required regulations.

Administrators in school district central offices oversee public schools under their jurisdiction. This group includes those who direct subject-area programs such as English, music, vocational education, special education, and mathematics. They supervise instructional coordinators and curriculum specialists, and work with them to evaluate curriculums and teaching techniques and improve them. Administrators also may oversee career counseling programs and testing that measures students’ abilities and helps to place them in appropriate classes. Others may also direct programs such as school psychology, athletics, curriculum and instruction, and professional development. With site-based management, administrators have transferred primary responsibility for many of these programs to the principals, assistant principals, teachers, instructional coordinators, and other staff in the schools.

In colleges and universities, academic deans, deans of faculty, provosts, and university deans assist presidents, make faculty appointments, develop budgets, and establish academic policies and programs. They also direct and coordinate the activities of deans of individual colleges and chairpersons of academic departments. Fundraising also is becoming an essential part of their job.

Department Heads
College or university department heads or chairpersons are in charge of departments that specialize in particular fields of study, such as English, biological science, or mathematics. In addition to teaching, they coordinate schedules of classes and teaching assignments; propose budgets; recruit, interview, and hire applicants for teaching positions; evaluate faculty members; encourage faculty development; serve on committees; and perform other administrative duties. In overseeing their departments, chairpersons must consider and balance the concerns of faculty, administrators, and students.

Higher Education Administrators
Higher education administrators also direct and coordinate the provision of student services. Vice presidents of student affairs or student life, deans of students, and directors of student services may direct and coordinate admissions, foreign student services, health and counseling services, career services, financial aid, and housing and residential life, as well as social, recreational, and related programs. In small colleges, they may counsel students. In larger colleges and universities, separate administrators may handle each of these services. Registrars are custodians of students’ records. They register students, record grades, prepare student transcripts, evaluate academic records, assess and collect tuition and fees, plan and implement commencement, oversee the preparation of college catalogs and schedules of classes, and analyze enrollment and demographic statistics. Directors of admissions manage the process of recruiting, evaluating, and admitting students, and work closely with financial aid directors, who oversee scholarship, fellowship, and loan programs. Registrars and admissions officers at most institutions need computer skills because they use electronic student information systems. For example, for those whose institutions present information—such as college catalogs and schedules—on the Internet, knowledge of online resources, imaging, and other computer skills is important. Athletic directors plan and direct intramural and intercollegiate athletic activities, seeing to publicity for athletic events, preparation of budgets, and supervision of coaches. Other increasingly important administrators direct fundraising, public relations, distance learning, and technology.

<< Back to subjects spotlights

Navigation for Newsweek Distance Learning Resources Index

Newsweek Distance Learning Home Page
What is Accreditation?
Ask the Experts
Glossary of Distance Learning and Online Learning Terminology
Spotlight on Jobs Associated with Distance Learning Courses

 
Upper Iowa University Online Program
Upper Iowa University Online Program 1101 5th Street
West Des Moines,
IA 50265
Tel: 800 603 3756
www.uiuonline.info
Click here for more information

West Texas A&M University
West Texas A&M University West Texas A&M University
Office of Admissions
2501 4th Avenue
Old Main Room 124
Canyon, Texas 79016-0001
Click here for more information

The University of Liverpool Laureate
The University of Liverpool Laureate
Click here for more information

Ashford University
Ashford University 400 North Bluff Blvd.
Clinton, Iowa 52732
Click here for more information

European-American University
European-American University 8, Copthall,
Roseau Valley,
Commonwealth of Dominica 00152
Click here for more information

Tiffin University
Tiffin University 155 Miami St.
Tiffin, OH 44883
Tel: 800-968-6446
[email protected]
Click here for more information

The American University of London (AUOL)
The American University of London (AUOL) The International Distance Learning Centre,
2 Old Brompton Rd.,
London, SW7 3DQ
Tel: + 44 (1)494 730 571
Tel: 877-215-0009
Click here for more information

Liberty University
Liberty University Distance Learning Admissions
1971 University Blvd
Lynchburg, VA 24502
Tel: 1-866-418-8734
Fax: 1-800-628-7977
Click here for more information

University of Massachusetts - UMassOnline
University of Massachusetts - UMassOnline 100 Morrissey Blvd.
Boston
MA 02125-3393
Tel: 617 287 7925
Click here for more information

The University of Toledo - Ohio
The University of Toledo - Ohio M.S. 516
Toledo OH
43606-3390
Tel: 866-886-5336
Tel: 419-530-8835
Click here for more information

Amberton University
Amberton University Amberton University
1700 Eastgate Dr.
Garland, TX 75041
Tel: 972 279 6511 ext.180
Click here for more information

Kaplan College
Kaplan College 6409 Congress Avenue
Boca Raton,
FL 33487
Tel: 866 522 7747
(Toll Free)
Click here for more information

Henley-Putnam University
Henley-Putnam University 25 Metro Drive, Suite 500
San Jose, CA 95110
Tel: 408-453-9900
Click here for more information

OSU Spears School of Business
OSU Spears School of Business 215 Business Building
Stillwater, OK 74078-4011
Tel: 866 678 3933
[email protected]
http://spears.okstate.edu/cepd/dl/
Click here for more information

National Universities Degree Consortium - NUDC
National Universities Degree Consortium - NUDC
Click here for more information

American Military University - 100 percent online degree programs for civilian and military students
American Military University - 100 percent online degree programs for civilian and military students 111 West Congress Street
Charles Town, WV 25414
Toll Free: 1-877-468-6268 (Press 2)
Click here for more information

Virginia Tech - Northern Virginia Center
Virginia Tech - Northern Virginia Center 7054 Haycock Road, Suite 361
Falls Church VA 22043
703-538-8384 (T)
703-538-8415 (F)
[email protected]
Click here for more information

Careers and Education
Careers and Education 3501 University Blvd. East
Adelphi, MD 20783
Tel: +1 800 888 8682
Click here for more information